Public perceptions of Lyme disease and climate change in southern Manitoba, Canada: making a case for strategic decoupling of climate and health messages

TitlePublic perceptions of Lyme disease and climate change in southern Manitoba, Canada: making a case for strategic decoupling of climate and health messages
Publication TypeJournal Article
Year of Publication2021
AuthorsCameron L, Rocque R, Penner K, Mauro I
JournalBMC Public Health
Volume21
Start Page617
Date Published03/2021
KeywordsCanada, climate change, Lyme disease, Public perceptions, Risk perception
Abstract

Findings indicate a broad range of knowledge and risk perceptions on both climate change and Lyme disease, which seem to reflect the controversy and complexity of both issues in the larger public discourse. Participants in high climate concern groups were found to have greater climate change knowledge, higher perception of risk, and less skepticism than those in low concern groups. Participants outside of the urban centre were found to have more familiarity with ticks, Lyme disease, and preventative behaviours, identifying differential sources of resilience and vulnerability. Risk perceptions of climate change and Lyme disease were found to vary independently rather than correlate, meaning that high climate change risk perception did not necessarily indicate high Lyme disease risk perception and vice versa.

URLhttps://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC8008613/