Pharmacological studies and pharmacokinetic modelling to support the development of interventions targeting ecological reservoirs of Lyme disease

TitlePharmacological studies and pharmacokinetic modelling to support the development of interventions targeting ecological reservoirs of Lyme disease
Publication TypeJournal Article
Year of Publication2024
JournalSci Rep
Volume14
Issue1
Date Published06/2024
AuthorsPelletier J, Bouchard C, Aenishaenslin C, Beaudry F, Ogden NH, Leighton P, Rocheleau JP
Keywordsfluralaner, Ixodes scapularis, Lyme disease, Mathematical model, Mus musculus, Peromyscus spp., Pharmacology, Reservoirs
Abstract

The development of interventions targeting reservoirs of Borrelia burgdorferi sensu stricto with acaricide to reduce the density of infected ticks faces numerous challenges imposed by ecological and operational limits. In this study, the pharmacokinetics, efficacy and toxicology of fluralaner were investigated in Mus musculus and Peromyscus leucopus mice, the main reservoir of B. burgdorferi in North America. Fluralaner showed rapid distribution and elimination, leading to fast plasma concentration (Cp) depletion in the first hours after administration followed by a slow elimination rate for several weeks, resulting in a long terminal half-life. Efficacy fell below 100% while Cp (± standard deviation) decreased from 196 ± 54 to 119 ± 62 ng/mL. These experimental results were then used in simulations of fluralaner treatment for a duration equivalent to the active period of Ixodes scapularis larvae and nymphs. Simulations showed that doses as low as 10 mg/kg have the potential to protect P. leucopus against infestation for a full I. scapularis active season if administered at least once every 7 days. This study shows that investigating the pharmacology of candidate acaricides in combination with pharmacokinetic simulations can provide important information to support the development of effective interventions targeting ecological reservoirs of Lyme disease. It therefore represents a critical step that may help surpass limits inherent to the development of these interventions.

URLhttps://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC11169648/