Monitoring the patterns of submission and presence of tick-borne pathogens in Ixodes scapularis collected from humans and companion animals in Ontario, Canada (2011-2017)

TitleMonitoring the patterns of submission and presence of tick-borne pathogens in Ixodes scapularis collected from humans and companion animals in Ontario, Canada (2011-2017)
Publication TypeJournal Article
Year of Publication2021
AuthorsNelder MP, Russell CB, Dibernardo A, Clow KM, Johnson S, Cronin K, Patel SN, Lindsay LR
JournalParasit Vectors.
Volume14
Start Page260
Issue1
Date Published05/2021
Keywordsanaplasma, babesia, borrelia, One Health, surveillance, Veterinary health, zoonotic
Abstract

During the study, there were 17,230 blacklegged tick samples submitted from humans and 4375 from companion animals. Tick submission rates from companion animals were higher than expected in several public health units (PHUs) lacking established tick populations, potentially indicating newly emerging populations. Pathogen prevalence in ticks was higher in PHUs where established blacklegged tick populations exist. Borrelia burgdorferi prevalence was higher in ticks collected from humans (maximum likelihood estimate, MLE = 17.5%; 95% confidence interval, CI 16.97-18.09%) than from companion animals (9.9%, 95% CI 9.15-10.78%). There was no difference in pathogen prevalence in ticks by host type for the remaining pathogens, which were found in less than 1% of tested ticks. The most common co-infection B. burgdorferi + B. miyamotoi occurred in 0.11% of blacklegged ticks from humans and animals combined. Borrelia burgdorferi prevalence was higher in unengorged (21.9%, 95% CI 21.12-22.65%) than engorged ticks (10.0%, 95% CI 9.45-10.56%). There were no consistent and significant spatiotemporal relationships detected via regression models between the annual rates of submission of each host type.

URLhttps://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC8127263/